Do you believe in your business? If so, your customers probably know it. Your actions speak louder than your words. Just SAYING you believe in helping your market and then only offering solutions they don’t want is not fully serving your market. Instead, it is not listening to your believers. Ignoring what your customers ask for will quickly put you out of business.

For example, let’s talk about a well-known video company (without saying their name.) Their customers are BEGGING the company for certain program upgrades.However, the video company is offering programs unwanted by the active players (and buyers.) What’s happening to the company’s reputation? It is quickly being revealed to be a company not to do business with. Their profits are dropping like deflated balloons. If only they would listen to their customers, things would improve. It remains to be seen if they will start to listen. Hope so for their benefit.

Customers watch your company’s behavior. They are interested in seeing you “walk your talk.” Prospects and customers are looking for trusted resources from whom to buy. When you believe in what you’re doing for your market, you show your company to be a trustworthy one.

Believe in Your Business & Show Customers You Genuinely Care About Them

Think about your own buying experiences. From whom do you buy? How do you feel about those businesses? Do you talk respectfully about them to others? How about sharing your testimonial about their products or customer service? If you are interested in sharing your testimonial about a certain company, that is a silent approval to other potential customers.

What are the reasons you like these companies? These are the kinds of things you want customers to say about YOUR company. This happens when you believe in your business and in what you’re doing for the market you serve.

Conversely, which companies do you absolutely mistrust? What are the reasons you mistrust them? (Think about the video company in the above example. Their marketing says one thing but it doesn’t align with their true intention.) Customers know if you believe in your business. If you’re only in business to make money rather than to serve a market, you may soon find yourself needing to get into a different business!

When you believe in your business, you have a movement mindset. For example, suppose you offer a pet sitting service. If you really love animals, you may also believe in no-kill animal shelters. If that is the case, develop relationships with no-kill animal shelters. They might be a good networking source for pet owners who may someday need pet sitters. Join those who think like you. That is sharing in a movement mindset.

Or, perhaps people who run no-kill animal shelters need volunteers. The more you volunteer, the more you get experience with all types of different animals. Those different experiences can lead to you writing books about your experiences or developing programs that help pet owners or the shelters.

When it comes to your business, determine what’s important to you. See if what’s important to you aligns with what’s important to your market members. If it does, why does it? Why do you believe in your business so strongly you want to tell others about what you’re doing?

Believe in your business and in what you are doing to improve other people’s life quality. With this type of mindset, you can form a successful marketing strategy that helps you build a trustworthy business reputation with your market audience.